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Medical Pathways in Australia - 2023-2024

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Medical school is the dream for so many of us - So how exactly can you get into medical school and what are the different pathway options available to students? This page will explore the different medical pathways in Australia and break down the differences in pre-requisites, scores, application processes and timelines. For further information about each specific medical school in Australia, visit the Australian Medical Schools Guide. If you’re looking for specific information on admission requirements and GAMSAT ® score cut-offs, head to our guide to Medical School Admission Requirements.

Navigating the complex medical pathways available to students in Australia can be a real challenge. The journey to becoming a doctor is varied and long. Our expert tutors, Nick and Alisha, have summarised the contents of this page in this video guide to make navigating medical pathways in Australia easier for you.

Pathways to Become a Doctor in Australia

Simply speaking, there are 2 broad pathways to becoming a doctor in Australia - undergraduate or graduate entry into medical school.

What is the difference between the Undergraduate and Graduate Medical Entry Pathways?

Undergraduate vs Graduate Medicine Pathways

Undergraduate Graduate
Previous Study Direct entry from year 12, no previous tertiary education required Previous tertiary education (minimum Bachelor's degree) required
General Entry Requirements ATAR + UCAT ® + Interview GPA + GAMSAT ® + Interview
Duration 5-6 years 4 years

What is the difference between the Undergraduate and Graduate Medical Entry Pathways?

Undergraduate vs Graduate Medicine Pathways

Undergraduate Graduate
Previous Study Direct entry from year 12, no previous tertiary education required Previous tertiary education (minimum Bachelor's degree) required
General Entry Requirements ATAR + UCAT ® + Interview GPA + GAMSAT ® + Interview
Duration 5-6 years 4 years

How to Become a Doctor in Australia

  1. Sit the UCAT Exam (Undergraduate entry)
  2. Complete Year 12 & Any Prerequisites
  3. Apply for Undergraduate Entry
  4. Complete a Bachelor’s Degree
  5. Sit the GAMSAT ® Exam (Graduate Entry)
  6. Apply for Graduate Entry
  7. Complete Medical School
  8. Complete an Intern Year
  9. Gain General Medical Registration
  10. Complete Prevocational Training
  11. Obtain Fellowship Through a Specialty Program

Becoming a doctor is a long, challenging, and highly competitive process. The various pathways can be incredibly confusing to navigate with various entry points (as outlined above), a broad range of requirements, and a variety of differences depending on where you plan to study. Below is a broad summary of the potential pathways - For further information, refer to the more detailed sections below on Undergraduate and Graduate entry .

Sit the UCAT Exam (Undergraduate entry)

If you plan on applying through the Undergraduate entry pathway (i.e. as a high school leaver), you’ll need to register for and sit the University Clinical Aptitude Test (UCAT ® ) in the year you plan to apply. Scores are only valid for one year - You cannot use scores from previous years.

The UCAT ® exam is a computer based admissions test used by the UCAT ANZ Consortium of universities in Australia and New Zealand for their medical, dental and clinical science degree programmes. The test helps universities to select applicants with the most appropriate abilities and professional behaviours required for new doctors and dentists to be successful in their clinical careers. Registration typically opens in March of each year and closes in May, with the exam being sat between July and August. For further details, review our guide here.

Complete Year 12 & Any Prerequisites

ATAR scores form part of the entry criteria for the Undergraduate pathway. As entry into medical school is highly competitive, students need to achieve extremely high ATAR scores, often a minimum of 95+ (though higher to be competitive). Furthermore, many medical schools require students to complete certain subject prerequisites in Year 12, which may include English, Maths, and one of the sciences (Biology, Chemistry, or Physics). For further information and a breakdown of ATAR score and Subject requirements, head to our overview of Australian Medical Schools.

Apply for Undergraduate Entry

If you plan on starting medical school after high school, you’ll need to apply for undergraduate entry, which often opens in August-September of each year. Students will need to apply to different medical schools individually, often through state-specific tertiary admissions services, such as VTAC , UAC , etc. Some universities, such as James Cook University, also require direct applications. For further details, head to our Overview of Australian Medical Schools . Most universities will require students to complete an interview as part of the application process.

Complete a Bachelor’s Degree

If you decide to take the graduate entry pathway you’ll need to complete a Bachelor’s degree first before undertaking a Doctor of Medicine. For those applying for the undergraduate pathway, it’s also a good idea to have a back-up plan and consider what Bachelor degrees may interest you in case you’re unsuccessful in applying for the undergraduate pathway.

You can complete any undergraduate degree of your choosing before studying medicine - Only one university, the University of Queensland , has subject prerequisites for Bachelor’s degrees. Almost all other graduate-entry universities will accept any Bachelor’s degree.

It’s important you perform well across your Bachelor’s degree as your GPA will form a key component of your application for graduate-entry medicine. The minimum GPA for applications is around 5-5.5 but it’s important to be aware that you’ll need a higher score (6+) to be competitive.

Sit the GAMSAT Exam (Graduate Entry)

The Graduate Australian Medical School Admissions Test (GAMSAT ® ) is a standardised exam used to assess the capacity to undertake high-level intellectual studies in the medical and health professional programs. The exam requires assumed knowledge equivalent to first year university levels of biology and chemistry along with a Year 12 level of physics, and is designed to assess your analytical and critical thinking skills.

The GAMSAT ® exam is held twice a year in March and September , with registration opening roughly 4 months prior to each sitting. Scores are valid for 4 years and form part of the application process for graduate entry medicine. For further details, read our guide on the GAMSAT ® exam and breakdown of how best to prepare.

Apply for Graduate Entry

Applications for graduate entry medicine open in May of the year prior to commencement. The majority of graduate entry medical schools organise applications through the GEMSAS consortium , with the University of Sydney , Flinders University , and Monash University the outliers that require direct applications.

GEMSAS coordinates applications, allows students to preference different medical schools, and helps coordinate interviews. The graduate entry admission process is long and complex, stretching from May-November of the year prior to commencement. For further details, referring to our guide on Medical School Entry Requirements.

Complete Medical School

You’ve finally gotten into medical school! The duration of study depends on the pathway you’ve taken, with Undergraduate-entry degrees taking 5-6 years, and Graduate-entry degrees taking 4 years (with the 3 years prior for a Bachelor’s degree). Regardless of the entry point, degrees are often split into pre-clinical years where you’ll study concepts such as physiology, anatomy, biochemistry, ethics, etc. and clinical years, where you’ll be placed in teaching hospitals to learn ‘on-the-job’. You’ll gain experience and exposure to different medical specialities as you’re rotated across different departments and hospitals. Many medical degrees will also incorporate research projects, and elective placement options domestically and overseas.

Complete an Intern Year

Following completion of medical school, you’ll undertake one year (47 weeks) as an intern in a hospital. You’ll be working as a junior doctor with provisional registration, with structured oversight and teaching to help you transition to practising as a doctor. Internships are often coordinated at the state level, with various bodies such as PMCV in Victoria or HETI in NSW responsible for matching students to a hospital. Applications are synchronised across all states within Australia and usually close in June the year prior to commencement.

Gain General Medical Registration

Following completion of your internship, you’ll be awarded general medical registration through the Medical Board of Australia. Registration renews on 30 September each year. Practicing graduates must therefore maintain registration throughout their career.

Complete Prevocational Training

After completing training as an intern, most graduates will complete additional training as Hospital Medical Officers for a number of years in preparation for different speciality programs. You’ll be able to choose between different interest areas, gain exposure and experience before applying to a speciality college and sitting any necessary exams.

Obtain Fellowship Through a Specialty Program

Once you’ve completed a sufficient amount of training and study, you can consider applying to admission into a medical speciality training program via speciality colleges. The criteria and exams vary across different specialities and may include a number of different assessments such as written, clinical and practical examinations, as well as research requirements. The vocational training program can vary in length from three to seven years, after which you’ll be able to work independently as a general practitioner or specialist physician or surgeon.

Is it hard to become a doctor in Australia?

As you can see from the steps explained above, becoming a doctor is a long and arduous process. It’s definitely not easy, and there will be challenges, but if you want to help people and make a difference, all of your hard work will be worth it in the end.

What is the best pathway to become a doctor?

It depends on your education background. The key difference between the undergraduate and graduate medical pathways is the point in time in which you can commence your medical studies. Undergraduate courses are primarily designed for students who are leaving high school and who haven’t yet completed an undergraduate degree (note that there are a few exceptions, with some undergraduate medical schools providing broader entry options - Refer to our guide on Australian Medical Schools for further information). As a result, undergraduate courses generally rely on a combination of ATAR, UCAT ® exam performance, and interview scores. As students haven’t yet completed any tertiary level studies, undergraduate courses are longer in length (around 5-6 years depending on the exact university).

On the other hand, graduate courses require students to have completed a Bachelor's degree (3 years) before commencing the course.

How can I study postgraduate Medicine in Australia?

Instead of taking ATAR and UCAT ® scores into account, graduate programs generally use GPA (from the previous degree/s) and GAMSAT ® scores plus an interview score - Some graduate entry medical schools also require a portfolio submission. As students have already completed a tertiary degree and have extra knowledge and experience under their belts, the graduate programs are considered a Masters degree and are shorter, typically lasting 4 years. This means that overall, graduate students will have been undertaking tertiary studies for a minimum of 7 years by the end of their medical degree.

Specific universities across both undergraduate and graduate programs may have additional pre-requisites or admissions criteria, and these details can be found in our Australian Medical Schools Guide. Whichever medical pathway you take, you will complete your degree with an AHPRA registration and be allowed to practise medicine as a doctor, thus starting the next stage of your learning and journey as a registered medical professional.

Which Universities offer Undergraduate vs Graduate Entry Medicine in Australia?

Undergraduate (Direct Entry) Graduate Provisional Degrees
University of Newcastle (UoN) / University of New England (UNE) Australian National University (ANU) University of Queensland (UQ), Central Queensland University (CQU) via UQ, and University of Southern Queensland via UQ
University of New South Wales (UNSW) University of Notre Dame Sydney (UNDS) Flinders University and Charles Darwin University (CDU), via Flinders University
University of Western Sydney (UWS) / Charles Sturt University (CSU) University of Sydney (USyd) University of Western Australia (UWA)
University of Adelaide (UniAdelaide) University of Wollongong (UoW) Griffith University and Sunshine Coast University, via Griffith University ^
Bond University * Macquarie University (MU)
James Cook University (JCU) * Griffith University
Monash University University of Queensland (UQ)
University of Tasmania Flinders University
Curtin University Deakin University
University of Melbourne (UniMelb)
Monash University #
University of Notre Dame Fremantle (UNDF)
University of Western Australia (UWA)
  • *Bond University and James Cook University do not require the UCAT ®
  • #Monash University graduate entry does not require the GAMSAT® and is only available to students who have completed an approved Bachelor’s degree at Monash University (i.e. external domestic applicants are not accepted)
  • ^Provisional entry to Griffith graduate medicine does not require the UCATBond University and James Cook University do not require the UCAT ®

In addition to the simple undergraduate vs graduate schema, there are 4 universities which offer provisional entry to graduate medical degrees for high school leavers. This essentially means that students apply in high school with their UCAT ® and ATAR results, and are provisionally accepted by the university into a graduate medical degree following the completion of an approved Bachelor’s degree at the university. These students will need to maintain a high GPA, but do not need to sit the GAMSAT ® or resubmit an application prior to commencing their graduate medical degree. For further information on these universities, you can refer to their individual descriptions on the Australian Medical Schools Guide.

Medical Pathways in Australia - Undergraduate Entry

Undergraduate Entry Medical Schools Australia

State University
NSW University of Newcastle (UoN) / University of New England (UNE) (joint program)
University of New South Wales (UNSW)
University of Western Sydney (UWS) / Charles Sturt University (CSU) (joint program)
VIC Monash University
QLD Bond University
James Cook University
University of Queensland (UQ)*
Central Queensland University (CQU) via UQ*
University of Southern Queensland via UQ*
Griffith University*
Sunshine Coast University via Griffith University*
SA University of Adelaide (UniAdelaide)
Flinders University*
WA Curtin University
University of Western Australia (UWA)*
TAS University of Tasmania
NT Charles Darwin University via Flinders University*
*Provisional offers to complete undergraduate degree followed by graduate medicine (see below section), but application and entry is based on ATAR and UCAT ® scores (except for Griffith provisional entry which does not require UCAT ® )

Undergraduate Medicine: Admissions & Entry Criteria

Which admissions tests do undergraduate medical schools accept?

The UCAT ® is the admissions exam used by undergraduate entry medical schools. Almost all universities offering undergraduate medicine degrees require the UCAT ® exam, with the exception of Bond University and James Cook University. The UCAT ® , or University Clinical Aptitude Test, is a 2 hour online multiple choice exam that is divided into 5 subsections - Verbal Reasoning, Decision Making, Quantitative Reasoning, Abstract Reasoning and Situational Judgement. As students will largely be applying directly as school-leavers, the exam is designed not to test scientific or medical knowledge, but rather to assess broader skills such as verbal, quantitative and abstract reasoning, as well as attributes such as empathy that are all considered desirable and advantageous for future doctors. For further information on the UCAT ® exam, check out our guide: What is the UCAT ® ?

Undergraduate Medicine: Pre-requisites

Generally speaking, the prerequisites for medicine through the undergraduate medical pathway are satisfactory results in the UCAT ® , a high ATAR score and successful completion of an interview. Some universities may additionally set subject prerequisites, such as for English or Sciences (Biology/Chemistry/Physics). This is dependent on the university, and a breakdown can be found below, with further details on our Australian Medical Schools Guide.

University Prerequisite Subjects
Flinders, CDU, UWS/CSU, UNSW, UoN/UNE No pre-requisite subjects necessary (though there may be English competency requirements)
UQ No pre-requisite subjects to begin the Bachelor degree (though there may be English competency requirements); however, UQ MD subject prerequisites must be completed during the Bachelor degree.
CQU English (Units 3 and 4, C) AND Mathematical Methods (Units 3 and 4, C) AND ONE OF Biology, Chemistry, or Physics (Units 3 and 4, C)
UniSQ English, Literature, English and Literature Extension or English as an Additional Language (Units 3 and 4, C), AND General Mathematics, Mathematical Methods or Specialist Mathematics (Units 3 and 4, C)
UniAdelaide SACE stage 2 biology OR chemistry OR mathematical methods (or equivalent)
Griffith (+USC) English OR English as an Additional Language OR Literature OR English and Literature Extension Units 3&4, C (or equivalent)
Monash 35/50 in English as an Alternate Language or 30/50 in English, AND 30/50 in Chemistry (or equivalent)
UTas CHM415115 Chemistry (or equivalent) AND (domestic students only) ENG315117 (or equivalent) English
Curtin Year 12 Chemistry (or equivalent)
UWA English OR Literature OR English as an Additional Language or Dialect ATAR: scaled mark of 50 or above (or equivalent), plus any prerequisite subjects for chosen undergraduate major
JCU English Units 3&4, C AND Mathematical Methods Units 3&4, C AND Chemistry Units 3&4, C (or equivalent)
Bond English OR English as an Additional Language OR Literature OR English and Literature Extension: Units 3&4, C (or equivalent)

Another important criterion to look out for is the highest level of study you have completed. Most undergraduate medicine universities will require you to be a high school leaver with no previous tertiary study experience, however some do allow you to have already commenced or even completed another degree. Again, a comparison can be found below or on our Australian Medical Schools Guide.

University Previous Study
UoN/UNE Your previous university study will be used to assess your academic eligibility if you have completed at least one year full-time (or its part-time equivalent) in a single program of study. In this case, you will not be considered based on your Year 12 results. Minimum requirements can be found on the UoN website.
UNSW All tertiary study accepted. If you've completed less than 0.75 FTE (full time equivalent) of university study at the end of the year prior to your desired commencement in the Medicine program, you'll be assessed only on your secondary school results. For students who have already completed a year of tertiary study, a minimum criteria of a 96.00 ATAR (secondary school component) and 70 WAM (tertiary study component) is needed. For these students, once the minimum requirements are met, the component with a higher selection rank can be used.

Domestic students in the second year of the Bachelor of Medical Science at UNSW can apply via UNSW Medicine’s Lateral Entry Scheme. They will be required to complete the Bachelor of Medical Science and undertake an Honours year before admission into the MD component of the UNSW Medicine degree program.
UniAdelaide If you wish to be considered as a Higher Education (Tertiary Transfer) applicant, your only record of study must be from the University of Adelaide. You must not have a tertiary record from any other Australian or overseas university (not including accelerated study in year 12).

To meet the minimum academic threshold as a Higher Education applicant:
  • First year students must have between 18 and 24 units of level 1 study and have achieved at least a credit average (Grade Point Average (GPA) of 5.0 or more) across all subjects
  • Second year students must have between 27 and 48 units of level 1 and 2 study and have achieved at least a credit average (GPA of 5.0 or more) across all subjects.
  • Third year students (having studied one or more level 3 subjects) are not eligible for entry into the Medical program at the University of Adelaide and should consider graduate medicine pathways.
Flinders Provisional entry for high school leavers only (but graduate entry exists for students who have commenced tertiary study)
CDU Applicants must not have completed more than one year of tertiary study to be eligible.
UWS /CSU All tertiary study accepted. Applicants who have studied more than one tertiary qualification are assessed on the basis of the qualification with the highest GPA that meets the requirements (minimum of one semester equivalent full-time).

There are also minimum GPA levels that apply. Please check UWS and CSU’s websites for the most up-to-date information.
UQ Provisional entry for high school leavers only (but graduate entry exists for students who have commenced tertiary study)
CQU High school leavers only.
UniSQ High school leavers only.
Griffith Provisional entry for high school leavers only (but graduate entry exists for students who have commenced tertiary study)
Monash Provisional entry for high school leavers only (but graduate entry exists for students who have commenced tertiary study).
UTas Tertiary study accepted, with a minimum unweighted GPA of 6.5. Applicants who have completed the Bachelor of Medical Research at the University of Tasmania in the year prior to commencement may apply via the Preferred Entry Pathway.
Curtin Tertiary study is accepted as long as the GPA meets the requirements (e.g. a Bachelor’s degree must have a Distinction average). Only a small number of places are given to non-school leavers.
UWA Provisional entry for high school leavers only (but graduate entry exists for students who have commenced tertiary study)
JCU A very limited number of places are available for applicants with tertiary study. Applicants who are not year 12 school leavers will be assigned an equivalent score calculated from previous completed study.
Bond

All tertiary study accepted. Applicants should also refer to the Entry Assessment table for guidance on whether to apply as an undergraduate or graduate applicant. Qualifications older than nine years immediately preceding the close of applications for the relevant application period cannot be considered. Bond University will offer approximately 80% of available places to undergraduate applicants and the remainder to graduate applicants.


Undergraduate Medicine: How do I apply?

Students wishing to study medicine through the undergraduate pathway will need to apply to sit the UCAT ® exam in the year before they wish to start their medical degree. It is important to note that UCAT ® results cannot be carried over from one year to the next. For example, if you wish to apply for a course commencing in 2025, you will need to sit the UCAT ® exam in 2024.

Students will then need to apply for their universities of choice. This is generally done through each state’s university admission service, e.g. TISC in WA, or in some cases can be done directly to the university itself. As there is no centralised application system (unlike GEMSAS for graduate entry medical schools ) the exact opening and closing deadlines will depend on the university and state you are applying to. Applications usually open around August, but again, ensure that you check each university’s website to confirm the exact details. This will likely be earlier than application deadlines for other courses as your interview will need to be scheduled prior to the end of the year.

Following review of your application, you may receive an interview offer. Interviews are held in a broad window from late-November all the way up until the end of January depending on the specific university. Once interviews are done, universities will then combine your scores and send out offers to the lucky students who have been successful in securing a place.

Undergraduate Medicine Pathway - Timeline

As there is no generalised body for applications through the undergraduate pathway (as there is with GEMSAS in the graduate entry pathway), the exact timeline for applications is dependent on the exact university and the state’s undergraduate admissions centre. As always, students are advised to check the key dates and deadlines on each university’s website. Below is a general guideline for the undergraduate pathway timeline:

Australian Medical Schools Admissions Timeline
* Application opening dates vary depending on the state’s undergraduate admission centre, e.g. UAC, TISC, SATAC, QTAC, VTAC.
Internal applications are needed for: UoN/UNE, UNSW, UTas, James Cook

Undergraduate Medicine Pathway Checklist

  • Register for the UCAT by 17 May 2023
  • Study for and sit the UCAT in July-August
  • Ensure you keep up with your year 12 studies as your ATAR will be just as important as your UCAT score
  • If you have already commenced further tertiary studies, ensure the university you will be applying for will accept your application as a non-school leaver
  • Review the details for each medical school and decide which schools you will be applying to
  • Ensure you have selected and met any subject prerequisites if needed
  • Note down the application process, admission centre and deadlines (as each state and university will differ) for all the universities you are interested in
  • Ensure you submit an application and any supporting documentation before the deadlines
  • Note the interview process for each university and practice interview questions
  • Attend interview if invited
  • Accept your offer by the given deadline

Medical Pathways in Australia - Graduate Entry

Which universities offer graduate-entry medicine in Australia?

As of 2023, there are currently 14 Medical Schools that provide a Graduate Entry Medical Program, 13 of which require the GAMSAT ® exam (or MCAT ® Exam for international students). Monash University graduate entry medicine does not require the GAMSAT ® and is only available to students who have completed an approved Bachelor’s degree at Monash University (i.e. external domestic applicants are not accepted)

Of these 13, 10 are members of the GAMSAT ® Consortium and their medical courses are participants in GEMSAS. The University of Sydney and Flinders University, are not part of GEMSAS, but still require the GAMSAT ® exam, as well as separate, direct applications.

State University
NSW University of Notre Dame Sydney (UNDS)
University of Sydney (USyd)
University of Wollongong (UoW)
Macquarie University (MU)
VIC University of Melbourne (UniMelb)
Deakin University
Monash University
QLD University of Queensland (UQ)*
Griffith University #
SA Flinders University^
WA University of Notre Dame Fremantle (UNDF)
University of Western Australia (UWA) &
ACT Australian National University (ANU)
TAS University of Tasmania

*UQ graduate program can be via graduate entry (requiring GAMSAT® and GPA) or via provisional entry (requiring UCAT® and ATAR, followed by an approved Bachelor’s degree at UQ, CQU, or UniSQ)
#Griffith graduate program can be via graduate entry (requiring ®and GPA) or via provisional entry (requiring ATAR only, followed by a Bachelor of Medical Science at either Griffith or Sunshine Coast University)
^Flinders graduate program can be completed in SA or NT via graduate entry (requiring GAMSAT® and GPA) or via provisional entry (requiring UCAT® and ATAR, followed by an approved Bachelor’s degree at Flinders in SA or Charles Darwin in NT)
&UWA graduate program can be via graduate entry (requiring GAMSAT® and GPA) or via provisional entry (requiring UCAT® and ATAR, followed by an approved Bachelor’s degree at UWA)

Graduate Medicine: Admissions & Entry Criteria

Which admissions tests do graduate medical schools in Australia accept?

The graduate medical pathway in Australia uses the GAMSAT ® exam as the admissions test. All universities offering graduate medicine degrees will require a GAMSAT ® score, with the exception of Monash University. The GAMSAT ® , or Graduate Medical School Admission Test, is a 5 hour exam developed by ACER. It is broken into 3 sections - Section 1: Reasoning in Humanities, Section 2: Written Communication, and Section 3: Reasoning in Biological and Physical Sciences. It’s designed to assess your analytical and critical thinking skills, as well as how you organise and communicate your ideas. Unlike the UCAT ® , the GAMSAT ® exam does draw on assumed knowledge in Biology, Chemistry, and Physics as students need to demonstrate that they are prepared to embark on a shorter and tougher graduate course. For further information on the GAMSAT ® exam itself, check out our page: What is the GAMSAT ® ? To get additional details on how the GAMSAT® scores are calculated, check out our GAMSAT ® Results Guide.

Graduate Medicine: Pre-requisites

The pre-requisites for graduate entry medicine are generally a high GAMSAT ® score and GPA, and satisfactory completion of an interview. Specific cut-offs and calculation methods for each university are explained in our Medical Admissions Requirements guide. As part of the definition of graduate entry, you are required to have completed a minimum of a Bachelor’s degree before commencing the graduate medical degree (although you can sit the GAMSAT ® and apply in your final year whilst studying). The University of Wollongong also requires students to submit a portfolio as part of their application. The University of Queensland is the sole graduate entry medical school which requires you to complete specific subject prerequisites, with further details provided on their website. Further information on prerequisites (including subject requirements and quotas) can be found on our Australian Medical Schools Guide , or on each university’s website.

Graduate Medicine: How do I apply?

Students will first need to apply to sit the GAMSAT ® exam via the ACER website. The GAMSAT ® exam runs twice a year, in March and September.

March GAMSAT ® exam September GAMSAT ® exam
Test Date Written Communication:
9 - 10 March 2024
Humanities and Biological Sciences:
22 - 24 March 2024
Written Communication:
31 August - 1 September 2024
Humanities and Biological Sciences:
13 - 15 September 2024
Registration Opens November 2023 May 2024
Registration Closes Monday 22 January 2024
9pm AEDT
10am GMT
Thursday 4 July 2024
10pm AEST
1pm BST
Late Registration Closure Thursday 1 February 2024
9pm AEDT
10am GMT
Thursday 11 July 2024
10pm AEST
1pm BST
Refund/Deferral Request Closure Thursday 1 February 2024
9pm AEDT
10am GMT
Thursday 11 July 2024
10pm AEST
1pm BST
Cost AUD$549 AUD$549
Late Fee AUD$110 AUD$110
Results Available Late May 2024 Mid November 2024

Unlike the UCAT ® exam, GAMSAT ® results remain valid for four years, so you can sit the exam whilst you’re still studying your undergraduate degree if you choose to. If you’re planning on applying in the near future, you can use the below table to guide you:

Application Details Valid Results
Apply 2024 for 2025 Commencement March GAMSAT ® : 2021, 2022, 2023, 2024
September GAMSAT ® : 2020, 2021, 2022, 2023
Apply 2025 for 2026 Commencement March GAMSAT ® : 2022, 2023, 2024, 2025
September GAMSAT ® : 2021, 2022, 2023, 2024
Apply 2026 for 2027 Commencement March GAMSAT ® : 2023, 2024, 2025, 2026
September GAMSAT ® : 2022, 2023, 2024, 2025

GAMSAT ® exam results are generally released within 2 months of sitting the exam. Regardless of the specific sitting you sat, applications for graduate programs are accepted annually through GEMSAS. GEMSAS , or the Graduate Entry Medical Schools Admissions System, manages applications, calculates grade point averages (GPAs) and applies individual school selection rules to allocate and organise interview and course offers to candidates around Australia. For further details, you can visit their website. Of the 12 graduate medical universities that use the GAMSAT® exam, 10 of them operate via GEMSAS. The University of Sydney and Flinders University are the exceptions - Both require separate direct applications. For further details head to the respective university websites.

Once GEMSAS has assessed your application in line with each university’s requirements, successful candidates will receive an interview offer in line with their highest preference that is satisfied with their scores so far. These students will sit their interviews in September-October, after which GEMSAS will add your interview scores to your application and send out acceptance offers to successful students. For further details refer to our comprehensive guide to the Medical Admissions Process & Entry Requirements.

Event Dates
Application Period. Submit your application through GEMSAS.
University of Sydney, Flinders University & Monash Uni are not part of GEMSAS
March - May 2024
GAMSAT ® Results Released. Late May 2024
Interview Offers Released August - September 2024
Interviews are held September - October 2024
Medical Offers Released September - December 2024
Additional Offers made to fill vacancies December 2024 - January 2025

How should I order my preferences in GEMSAS?

The most important thing to note is that once you receive an offer from a GEMSAS school, if you decline an offer of a place, you will not be considered for another place or receive another offer. This is why it is so important to be mindful of your order of preferences (as well as specifics such as fee type and campus location) when you submit your application.

Each applicant’s eligibility and competitiveness will be assessed for their number one preference. If the applicant does not meet the requirements or is not highly ranked enough to gain an interview offer at their first preference, they will be assessed for their second preference, then their third and so on until an interview offer is made or all preferences are exhausted. After medical school interviews , the above process will be repeated using interview scores in the calculations (according to each school’s selection rules). However, a student cannot be accepted for a graduate medical school position at a school that is higher on their preference list than the school they interviewed at. For example, if you complete an interview at your fourth preference school, your application for a final offer will be considered for your fourth, then if unsuccessful your fifth preference and so on. It will not be considered for your first, second, or third preferences in such a case.

Clearly, it is important to choose your preferences wisely. It is important to read carefully through this page and the GEMSAS admission guide - learn about how each university weighs its admission criteria and find where you may be more competitive. You may find that you have a lot of life experience and extracurricular activities that lend well to a university that uses a portfolio. Or if you find that you have a low GPA but a high GAMSAT ® score, you may want to apply for universities that give greater weight to the GAMSAT ® score in the calculation of your final score. Check out our Australian Medical Schools Overview for more specific information about each university.

Ultimately, however, it is most important that you order your preferences based on where you actually want to study and where you will be the happiest. A medical degree requires a lot of time, energy and commitment, and you need to know that you will be comfortable with your decision, especially if it involves moving interstate. Check out our blog article Which Med School is for Me? To learn more about what you should take into consideration when choosing medical schools.

Studying Medicine as a Mature Age Student

Mature age students are generally unable to apply for undergraduate medicine, as this pathway is typically limited to school leavers (or up to three years after leaving high school in some cases). Mature age students however will be eligible to apply for graduate-entry medicine if they meet the admissions criteria. Most graduate-entry universities have a 10 year rule - that is, applicants will need to have successfully completed at least a three year Bachelor degree prior to commencement of the medical program. Some universities may also accept applicants who have completed another degree, such as a PhD, within the last 10 years, even if the Bachelor degree was not completed within the last 10 years. Of note, the University of Western Australia, and Flinders University do not have a 10 year rule. For more information, read each university profile on our guide to Australian Medical Schools and, as always, check with each university directly for up-to-date verified information. For further perspectives on the challenges and advantages of starting medicine as a mature age student, check out our article on Medicine for Mature Age Students.

Graduate Pathway Timeline

Australian Medical Schools Admissions Timeline

Graduate Medicine Pathway Checklist

  • If you are wishing to apply for the next intake, ensure you are eligible for your universities of choice, e.g. have/will have the correct tertiary study requirements, have/will have a valid GAMSAT result
  • Register for the March GAMSAT and/or the September GAMSAT by their respective due dates. It’s generally recommended that you first sit the GAMSAT exam in your penultimate year of study to ensure that you have additional sittings in case you need to aim for a higher score.
  • Study for and sit the March and/or September GAMSAT
  • The GEMSAS Admissions guide is generally released in April of each year - Review the details for each medical school by looking through the GEMSAS guide and the individual university guides for medical schools that operate outside of GEMSAS.
  • It can often be useful to calculate your GPA when reviewing the admissions criteria to understand how competitive you are at different medical schools - The GEMSAS GPA calculator is useful for this purpose.
  • Decide which schools you will be applying to and how you wish to order your preferences
  • Begin organising any supporting documentation early on to account for any potential delays. Make a note of important submission deadlines.
  • Submit your application to GEMSAS by the deadline, and directly to USyd, Monash and Flinders if chosen
  • Ensure all supporting documentation (e.g. for alternative pathways or rural applications) has been completed and sent to the relevant institutions by their deadlines
  • Start preparing for a medical interview - Review the interview process for each university and starting doing practice interview questions
  • Accept interview offer if provided and sit your medical interview
  • Accept your offer by the given deadline

Useful Resources

  1. What is the GAMSAT ® ?

    Everything you need to know about the GAMSAT ® Exam from structure and overview to which universities require the GAMSAT ®

  2. What is the UCAT ® ?

    Everything you need to know about the UCAT ® Exam from structure and overview to key dates and test locations.

  3. How to study for the GAMSAT ® Exam

    A breakdown of how to approach study effectively and how to set up a GAMSAT ® study schedule.

  4. Understanding your GAMSAT ® Results

    Covers everything you need to know about your GAMSAT ® Results - From how scoring works to the results release dates.

  5. Australian Graduate Medical Schools Guide - Admission Requirements

    Covers everything you need to know about Australian graduate medical school admission requirements and GAMSAT ® score cut-offs.

  6. Australian Medical Schools Overview

    An overview of Australian Medical Schools, both undergraduate and graduate, with details on the course and entry criteria for each medical school.

  7. GradReady GAMSAT Preparation Courses

    The Best Results at the Best Value - The only provider with statistically significant results over 10 years - Average student improvement of 20+ Percentile Points.

  8. InterviewReady Courses

    Get ready for your medical application interview with tailored preparation for specific universities and formats. 90% Medical School Admission Rate.

  9. Guide to Medicine MMIs: Multiple Mini-Interviews

    An overview of the structure and preparation for MMIs, including the types of MMI questions to expect and which universities use Multiple Mini-Interviews.

Preparing for the GAMSAT ® Exam is one of the first and most important steps to studying medicine in Australia. Sign up for our GAMSAT ® Free Trial for detailed week by week plans of how you should be spending your time and tips on the best preparation strategy as well as free practice MCQs.